Healthy Weight DNA Kit

Home DNA Healthy Weight Kit

NEED YOUR DNA KIT DELIVERY TODAY? CONTACT 1.866.234.7080

YOU MAY QUALIFY FOR SAME DAY DELIVERY IN THE BROWARD COUNTY AREA!

Have questions? call now 1.866.234.7080

TEST RESULTS INCLUDE

• Detailed analysis of the genetic markers

• Personalized recommendations for:

o Foods to eat—the best foods to meet caloric needs

o Nutrients—Optimal nutrient needs and supplements

o Best exercises—Ideal exercises to achieve and maintain healthiest weight

• Exclusive online access to a comprehensive resource library containing hundreds of articles, videos, and recipes

Home DNA Healthy Weight Kit

HEALTHIER YOU THROUGH GENETICS

ABOUT HOMEDNA TM

HomeDNA Healthy Weight is a revolutionary

and then provides customized diet and exercise strategies for a healthier life. With the genetic

of the human genome available today, it is now possible to develop individually-tailored nutrition

unique DNA. They simply collect their DNA using the easy-to-use cheek swabs, mail the samples to the lab, and within a few short weeks.

BENEFITS

• Learning more about an individual’s genetic

• Obtaining individually-tailored nutrition and

exercise recommendations

• Receiving ongoing support through a library of videos, articles, and recipes curated to each test participant’s genotype.

Results Back:

Just 4-6 weeks from receipt of samples at the lab

$155.00

LATEST SCIENCE STUDIES USE FOR HOME DNA HEALTY WEIGHT RESULTS

CLICK here for more inf, including over 40 scientific studies links!

  • WEIGHT LOSS ABILITY

  • Hum Hered. 2013;75(2-4):160-74. doi: 10.1159/000353181. Epub 2013 Sep 27.

Human cardiovascular disease IBC chip-wide association with weight loss and weight regain in the look AHEAD trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24081232

McCaffery JM, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Erar B, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group

  • Diabetes. 2012 Nov;61(11):3005-11. doi: 10.2337/db11-1799. Epub 2012 Aug 13.

FTO genotype and 2-year change in body composition and fat distribution in response to weight-loss diets.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22891219

Zhang X, Qi Q, Zhang C, Smith SR, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Bray GA, Qi L.


  • Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Dec;37(12):1545-52. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2013.54. Epub 2013 Apr 3.

FTO predicts weight regain in the Look AHEAD clinical trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854

McCaffery JM1, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Hudnall GE, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group


  • Diabetes. 2010 Mar;59(3):747-50. doi: 10.2337/db09-1050. Epub 2009 Dec 22.

Gene variants of TCF7L2 influence weight loss and body composition during lifestyle intervention in a population at risk for type 2 diabetes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20028944

Haupt A, Thamer C, Heni M, Ketterer C, Machann J, Schick F, Machicao F, Stefan N, Claussen CD, Häring HU, Fritsche A, Staiger H.


  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Nov;96(5):1129-36. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.038125. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

TCF7L2 genetic variants modulate the effect of dietary fat intake on changes in body composition during a weight-loss intervention

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23034957

Mattei J, Qi Q, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.


  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Feb;99(2):392-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.072066. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Variants in glucose- and circadian rhythm-related genes affect the response of energy expenditure to weight-loss diets

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24335056

Mirzaei K, Xu M, Qi Q, de Jonge L, Bray GA, Sacks F, Qi L


  • Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):363-6. doi: 10.2337/dc11-1328. Epub 2011 Dec 16.

Genetic predictors of weight loss and weight regain after intensive lifestyle modification, metformin treatment, or standard care in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=22179955

Delahanty LM, Pan Q, Jablonski KA, Watson KE, McCaffery JM, Shuldiner A, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Florez JC, Franks PW; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.


  • Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6.

Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174

Lindi VI, Uusitupa MI, Lindström J, Louheranta A, Eriksson JG, Valle TT, Hämäläinen H, Ilanne-Parikka P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Laakso M, Tuomilehto J; Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.


  • Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.

The PPAR-gamma P12A polymorphism modulates the relationship between dietary fat intake and components of the metabolic syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174

Robitaille J, Després JP, Pérusse L, Vohl MC.


  • Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.

Interaction between a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene polymorphism and dietary fat intake in relation to body mass.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14506127

Memisoglu A, Hu FB, Hankinson SE, Manson JE, De Vivo I, Willett WC, Hunter DJ.


  • FOOD – PROTEIN UTILIZATION

  • Int J Obes (Lond). 2013 Dec;37(12):1545-52. doi: 10.1038/ijo.2013.54. Epub 2013 Apr 3.

FTO predicts weight regain in the Look AHEAD clinical trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854

McCaffery JM1, Papandonatos GD, Huggins GS, Peter I, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Hudnall GE, Lipkin EW, Kitabchi AE, Wagenknecht LE, Wing RR; Genetic Subgroup of Look AHEAD; Look AHEAD Research Group.


  • FOOD – FAT UTILIZATION

  • Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):363-6. doi: 10.2337/dc11-1328. Epub 2011 Dec 16.

Genetic predictors of weight loss and weight regain after intensive lifestyle modification, metformin treatment, or standard care in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23628854

Delahanty LM, Pan Q, Jablonski KA, Watson KE, McCaffery JM, Shuldiner A, Kahn SE, Knowler WC, Florez JC, Franks PW; Diabetes Prevention Program Research Group.

  • Diabetes. 2002 Aug;51(8):2581-6.

Association of the Pro12Ala polymorphism in the PPAR-gamma2 gene with 3-year incidence of type 2 diabetes and body weight change in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12145174

Lindi VI, Uusitupa MI, Lindström J, Louheranta A, Eriksson JG, Valle TT, Hämäläinen H, Ilanne-Parikka P, Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S, Laakso M, Tuomilehto J; Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study


  • Clin Genet. 2003 Feb;63(2):109-16.

The PPAR-gamma P12A polymorphism modulates the relationship between dietary fat intake and components of the metabolic syndrome.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=12630956

Robitaille J, Després JP, Pérusse L, Vohl MC.


  • Hum Mol Genet. 2003 Nov 15;12(22):2923-9. Epub 2003 Sep 23.

Interaction between a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene polymorphism and dietary fat intake in relation to body mass.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=14506127

Memisoglu A, Hu FB, Hankinson SE, Manson JE, De Vivo I, Willett WC, Hunter DJ.


  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Nov;96(5):1129-36. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.112.038125. Epub 2012 Oct 3.

TCF7L2 genetic variants modulate the effect of dietary fat intake on changes in body composition during a weight-loss intervention.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=2303495

Mattei J, Qi Q, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.


  • Circulation. 2006 May 2;113(17):2062-70. Epub 2006 Apr 24.

Dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids modulates effect of apolipoprotein A5 gene on plasma fasting triglycerides, remnant lipoprotein concentrations, and lipoprotein particle size: the Framingham Heart Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=16636175

Lai CQ, Corella D, Demissie S, Cupples LA, Adiconis X, Zhu Y, Parnell LD, Tucker KL, Ordovas JM.


  • Clin Genet. 2005 Aug;68(2):152-4.

A polymorphism in the apolipoprotein A5 gene is associated with weight loss after short-term diet.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=15996212

Aberle J, Evans D, Beil FU, Seedorf U.


  • J Mol Med (Berl). 2007 Feb;85(2):119-28. Epub 2007 Jan 9.

APOA5 gene variation modulates the effects of dietary fat intake on body mass index and obesity risk in the Framingham Heart Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=17211608

Corella D, Lai CQ, Demissie S, Cupples LA, Manning AK, Tucker KL, Ordovas JM.


  • J Nutr. 2011 Mar;141(3):380-5. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.130344. Epub 2011 Jan 5.

APOA5 gene variation interacts with dietary fat intake to modulate obesity and circulating triglycerides in a Mediterranean population.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21209257

Sánchez-Moreno C, Ordovás JM, Smith CE, Baraza JC, Lee YC, Garaulet M.

  • Circulation. 2013 Mar 26;127(12):1283-9. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.112.000586. Epub 2013 Feb 27.

Variants in glucose- and circadian rhythm-r elated genes affect the response of energy expenditure to weight-loss diets: the POUNDS LOST Trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24335056

Mirzaei K, Xu M, Qi Q, de Jonge L, Bray GA, Sacks F, Qi L.


  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Feb;99(2):392-9. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.072066. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Genetic determinant for amino acid metabolites and changes in body weight and insulin resistance in response to weight-loss diets: the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS LOST trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=23446828

Xu M, Qi Q, Liang J, Bray GA, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.


  • FOOD – CARB UTILIZATION

  • Circulation. 2011 Aug 2;124(5):563-71. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.025767. Epub 2011 Jul 11.

Insulin receptor substrate 1 gene variation modifies insulin resistance response to weight-loss diets in a 2-year randomized trial.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=21747052

Qi Q, Bray GA, Smith SR, Hu FB, Sacks FM, Qi L.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN B9 – FOLATE TENDENCY

  • Proc Nutr Soc. 2014 Feb;73(1):47-56. doi: 10.1017/S0029665113003613. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

MTHFR 677TT genotype and disease risk: is there a modulating role for B-vitamins?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24131523

Reilly R, McNulty H1, Pentieva K, Strain JJ, Ward M.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN A TENDENCY

  • FASEB J. 2009 Apr;23(4):1041-53. doi: 10.1096/fj.08-121962. Epub 2008 Dec 22.

Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding beta-carotene 15,15’-monoxygenase alter beta-carotene metabolism in female volunteers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19103647

Leung WC, Hessel S, Méplan C, Flint J, Oberhauser V, Tourniaire F, Hesketh JE, von Lintig J, Lietz G.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN B6TENDENCY

  • Am J Hum Genet. 2009 Apr;84(4):477-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.02.011. Epub 2009 Mar 19.

Genome-wide association study of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, and homocysteine blood concentrations.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19303062

Tanaka T, Scheet P, Giusti B, Bandinelli S, Piras MG, Usala G, Lai S, Mulas A, Corsi AM, Vestrini A, So i F, Gori AM, Abbate R, Guralnik J, Singleton A, Abecasis GR, Schlessinger D, Uda M, Ferrucci L.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN B12TENDENCY

  • Nat Genet. 2008 Oct;40(10):1160-2. doi: 10.1038/ng.210. Epub 2008 Sep 7.

Common variants of FUT2 are associated with plasma vitamin B12 levels.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=18776911

Hazra A, Kraft P, Selhub J, Giovannucci EL, Thomas G, Hoover RN, Chanock SJ, Hunter DJ.


  • Am J Hum Genet. 2009 Apr;84(4):477-82. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.02.011. Epub 2009 Mar 19.

Genome-wide association study of vitamin B6, vitamin B12, folate, and homocysteine blood concentrations.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=19303062

Tanaka T, Scheet P, Giusti B, Bandinelli S, Piras MG, Usala G, Lai S, Mulas A, Corsi AM, Vestrini A, So i F, Gori AM, Abbate R, Guralnik J, Singleton A, Abecasis GR, Schlessinger D, Uda M, Ferrucci L.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN C TENDENCY

  • Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Aug;92(2):375-82. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2010.29438. Epub 2010 Jun 2.

Genetic variation at the SLC23A1 locus is associated with circulating concentrations of L-ascorbic acid (vitamin C : evidence from 5 independent studies with >15,000 participants.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20519558

Timpson NJ, Forouhi NG, Brion MJ, Harbord RM, Cook DG, Johnson P, McConnachie A, Morris RW, Rodriguez S, Luan J, Ebrahim S, Padmanabhan S, Watt G, Bruckdorfer KR, Wareham NJ, Whincup PH, Chanock S, Sattar N, Lawlor DA, Davey Smith G.


  • NUTRIENTS – VITAMIN D TENDENCY

  • Lancet. 2010 Jul 17;376(9736):180-8. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(10)60588-0. Epub 2010 Jun 10.

Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=20541252

Wang TJ, Zhang F, Richards JB, Kestenbaum B, van Meurs JB, Berry D, Kiel DP, Streeten EA, Ohlsson C, Koller DL, Peltonen L,Cooper JD, O’Reilly PF, Houston DK, Glazer NL, Vandenput L, Peacock M, Shi J, Rivadeneira F, McCarthy MI, Anneli P, de Boer IH,Mangino M, Kato B, Smyth DJ, Booth SL, Jacques PF, Burke GL, Goodarzi M, Cheung CL, Wolf M, Rice K, Goltzman D, Hidiroglou N, Ladouceur M, Wareham NJ, Hocking LJ, Hart D, Arden NK, Cooper C, Malik S, Fraser WD, Hartikainen AL, Zhai G, Macdonald HM, Forouhi NG, Loos RJ, Reid DM, Hakim A, Dennison E, Liu Y, Power C, Stevens HE, Jaana L, Vasan RS, Soranzo N, Bojunga J,Psaty BM, Lorentzon M, Foroud T, Harris TB, Hofman A, Jansson JO, Cauley JA, Uitterlinden AG, Gibson Q, Järvelin MR, Karasik D, Siscovick DS, Econs MJ, Kritchevsky SB, Florez JC, Todd JA, Dupuis J, Hyppönen E, Spector TD.


  • EXERCISE – FAT RESPONSE TO CARDIO

  • J Appl Physiol (1985). 2001 Sep;91(3):1334-40.

Evidence of LPL gene-exercise interaction for body fat and LPL activity : the HERITAGE Family Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11509533

Garenc C, Pérusse L, Bergeron J, Gagnon J, Chagnon YC, Borecki IB, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C.


  • Obes Res. 2003 May;11(5):612-8.

Effects of beta2-adrenergic receptor gene variants on adiposity: the HERITAGE Family Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12740450

Garenc C, Pérusse L, Chagnon YC, Rankinen T, Gagnon J, Borecki IB, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family Study


  • EXERCISE – FITNESS RESPONSE TO CARDIO

  • Physiol Genomics. 2003 Jul 7;14(2):161-6.

Associations between cardiorespiratory responses to exercise and the C34T AMPD1 gene polymorphism in the HERITAGE Family Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12783984

Rico-Sanz J, Rankinen T, Joanisse DR, Leon AS, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Rao DC, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family study.


  • Metabolism. 2004 Feb;53(2):193-202.

Apolipoprotein E genotype and changes in serum lipids and maximal oxygen uptake with exercise training.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14767871

Thompson PD, Tsongalis GJ, Seip RL, Bilbie C, Miles M, Zoeller R, Visich P, Gordon P, Angelopoulos TJ, Pescatello L, Bausserman L, Moyna N.


  • Metabolism. 2004 Jan;53(1):108-16.

Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphism with blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake in the sedentary state and after exercise training in the HERITAGE family study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681851

Leon AS, Togashi K, Rankinen T, Després JP, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Bouchard C


  • EXERCISE – BODY COMPOSITION RESPONSE TO STRENGTH TRAINING

  • International Journal of Obesity (2015) 39, 1371–1375; doi:10.1038/ijo.2015.78; published online 26 May 2015

High genetic risk individuals benefit less from resistance exercise intervention

http://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v39/n9/abs/ijo201578a.html

Y C Klimentidis, J W Bea, T Lohman, P-S Hsieh, S Going and Z Chen


  • EXERCISE – HDL RESPONSE TO CARDIO

  • Metabolism. 2004 Jan;53(1):108-16.

Association of apolipoprotein E polymorphism with blood lipids and maximal oxygen uptake in the sedentary state and after exercise training in the HERITAGE family study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14681851

Leon AS, Togashi K, Rankinen T, Després JP, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Wilmore JH, Bouchard C.


  • EXERCISE – INSULIN SENSITIVITY RESPONSE TO CARDIO

  • Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jun;288(6):E1168-78. Epub 2005 Feb 1.

Endurance training-induced changes in insulin sensitivity and gene expression.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15687108

Teran-Garcia M, Rankinen T, Koza RA, Rao DC, Bouchard C.


  • Diabetes. 2005 Jul;54(7):2251-5.

Hepatic lipase gene variant -514C>T is associated with lipoprotein and insulin sensitivity response to regular exercise: the HERITAGE Family Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15983229

Teran-Garcia M, Santoro N, Rankinen T, Bergeron J, Rice T, Leon AS, Rao DC, Skinner JS, Bergman RN, Després JP, Bouchard C; HERITAGE Family Study.


  • EXERCISE – GLUCOSE RESPONSE TO CARDIO

  • Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2005 Jun;288(6):E1168-78. Epub 2005 Feb 1.

Influence of Pro12Ala peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 polymorphism on glucose response to exercise training in type 2 diabetes.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986237

Adamo KB, Sigal RJ, Williams K, Kenny G, Prud’homme D, Tesson F.


  • Diabetologia. 2010 Apr;53(4):679-89. doi: 10.1007/s00125-009-1630-2. Epub 2009 Dec 31.

Improvements in glucose homeostasis in response to regular exercise are influenced by the PPARG Pro12Ala variant: results from the HERITAGE Family Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20043145

Ruchat SM, Rankinen T, Weisnagel SJ, Rice T, Rao DC, Bergman RN, Bouchard C, Pérusse L.


  • Metabolism. 2003 Feb;52(2):209-12.

PPARgamma gene polymorphism is associated with exercise-mediated changes of insulin resistance in healthy men.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12601634

Kahara T, Takamura T, Hayakawa T, Nagai Y, Yamaguchi H, Katsuki T, Katsuki K, Katsuki M, Kobayashi K.

FAQS

  • What genes are analyzed with the Healthy Weight test?

Our lab analyzes genetic markers (SNPS) that have been shown through external research to be related to various ways the human body processes food, nutrients and physical exercise.


  • How long does it take to get my results?

Typical turnaround time for getting results is 4- 6 weeks, once samples arrive at the lab. We will email you as soon as your report is ready.


  • Do I ever need to be re-tested?

No. There is no need to retake the HomeDNA Healthy Weight test as your genes will never change. In terms of testing DNA, your DNA is the same throughout your entire life. This is a once-in-a-lifetime investment that takes away the guesswork when it comes to dieting and exercise.


  • What information is included in my report?

Your HomeDNA Healthy Weight report contains nutrition and exercise recommendations specific to your genetic test results (i.e., your DNA). The nutrition information discusses in easy language how much protein, carbohydrates and fat you should consume daily, which nutrients for which you may be at risk of deficiency, and which foods are good sources of those nutrients. You will learn how your body responds to fat, protein and carbohydrate intake in relation to how you use them for energy, and thus, how best to eat in order to lose body fat.

Your HomeDNA Healthy Weight report also indicates how likely you are to use fat for energy during different types of exercise. It will give you specific information about exercises that are best aligned with your genetic test results: which types, at what intensity, for how long, and how often.


  • Do you test for any serious inherited diseases?

No. HomeDNA Healthy Weight focuses solely on those genes that are related to the body’s ability to process food, nutrients and physical exercise. Any DNA test performed to detect predictors for disease should be interpreted by a physician or a certified genetic counselor.


  • How dependable are the results?

The algorithm used for this test is based on the latest science. Please see our “Resources” tab below for links to studies.

We have laboratory protocols that ensure very high accuracy, and so you can be sure your test has been processed correctly. Your genes play a big role in your body composition but it’s also important to realize lifestyle and diet play a significant role as well.


  • How is my personal and DNA information protected?

We value the trust you place in us. To prevent unauthorized access or disclosure, to retain data accuracy, and to ensure the use of the information, we use a range of technical, physical and administrative, HIPAA-compliant, measures to protect the information we collect about our members. And your information will never be sold. View our privacy policy for more information.


*The above faqs are provided for informational purpose only and believe to be accurate. My Paternity DNA Plus.com is not responsible for any innacurate information typos found or posted on any pages found on this site.

Collection Instructions DNA Buccal Swabs.

Once You have pick up and received your kit simply follow this instructions:

*To maintain the integrity of the DNA sample, avoid eating, drinking, or smoking for about 20-30 minutes prior to swabbing. Doing so does not change the DNA or affect the result of the test, but foreign substances on a swab may negatively affect the ability to effectively extract the DNA.

  1. Fill out and complete the requested information on the provided sample envelope.

  2. Working on a clean surface place gloves use 4 DNA collections swabs. 1 swab at a time(keep cotton swab away for contact any surface), open mouth and rub against swabbing firmly back and forth and up and down on the inside cheek wall for about 10-15 seconds minimum on each side of the mouth chik. be sure to rotate the swab. to prevent collecting excess saliva, avoid the gum area. To dry, hold and wave swab for about 60 seconds, then place it directly into the properly-labeled DNA sample envelope.

  3. Place DNA sample envelopes inside the provided prepaid Fedex trackable envelope and drop it off at your nearest Fedex location. (DO NOT ship via USPS as your specimens will be lost)

  4. Results will be vailable in Just 6 weeks from receipt of samples at the lab

*Any questions please contact us at 1.866.234.7080 or via email: info@mypaternitydnaplus.com